Farsley Farfield Year 5 Blog

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It’s all Greek to me…

16/10/2020 at 16:47

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Maths

In maths this week, both classes have been recapping addition – particularly how to use the column method to solve problems. For this, we had to think very carefully about the numbers we were dealing with. The first obstacle we came across was making sure that the columns were lined up correctly so that we could calculate the sum. We very quickly discovered that if the columns were not lined up correctly we could end up with some drastically different answers. We also recapped exchanging and the reasons that it is sometimes necessary to do so. After proving we knew enough to solve given calculations, we turned to our reasoning skills to try and work out the values of missing digits in calculations. Have a go at this one – can you work it out? Hint: There may have been some exchanging taking place!

Literacy

Our literacy lessons this week have been revolving around writing our own stories in the style of Greek myths. To start, we spent some time pulling apart the structure of existing myths and then using this to help plan our own. Some of our lessons from last week (including designing a monster and describing a mythical setting) really helped with this. Once we had everything planned out, we started writing, spending two lessons on it to really give the children chance to flesh out their mythical tales. We can’t wait to read them all!

Topic

This week in topic, we had a look at the impact the Ancient Greeks have had throughout history, including the modern day. The children were surprised to learn just how much of the things we have today were actually Greek inventions. We covered a wide range of subjects, including maths, science, medicine, language, theatre, sport and politics.

Did you know, for example, that many of the words we use today actually have their roots in Ancient Greek? Or that the Greeks actually created inventions such as the vending machine and the alarm clock? They are even credited with creating their own automatic doors, though these were rare and very slow to open!

Notices

This week’s maths homework is all about adding using the column method. Both this and last week’s learning log on figures from black history are due in next week on Wednesday 21st October.

We hope you have a wonderful weekend,

Miss Levett and Miss Wetherill

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Pulley Pattern Seeking

16/10/2020 at 16:19

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This week, we have been continuing our work on simple machines and how they can be used to make jobs easier by exploring the impact of pulleys. We started by watching a video that explained how pulleys worked and the impact of having certain numbers of pulleys in different arrangements. We discovered that, if we tried lifting a 1kg weight (which would take about 10N of force) with a single pulley at the top, it wouldn’t make a huge amount of difference. However, by moving this single pulley to the bottom or adding additional ones, the amount of force needed to lift it was only 5N (500g).

We then decided to put this idea to the test and set up a simple pulley outside. With our pulley being at the top of the model, we discovered that the experiment in the video was true – it didn’t make that much difference. After some discussion, we decided that it could be due to the branch being too rough for the rope or the rope itself being too thin. 5L wanted to use a second branch to create and test a two pulley system, but unfortunately the rope was just not strong enough to cope. 5W on the other hand, decided to try creating a pulley on a smoother surface to see whether that made a difference or not.

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Athens v Sparta

09/10/2020 at 15:58

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This week, we have covered negative numbers and Roman numerals in maths and created a mythical monster in literacy. However, the highlight of the week was certainly Greek Day!

Both classes spent the day learning all about two cities states of Ancient Greece, Athens and Sparta. At the end of the day, children decided which state they would have rather lived in, based on the things they had learnt during the day.

Athens

Miss Wetherill spent half of the day trying to persuade the children to choose Athens as their preferred state. The children learnt about what life was like for girls, boys, women and men, how the government was run and about education. Then, the girls and boys were split into separate groups to show how differently they were treated in Athens. The boys were allowed to rehearse and perform a play, while the girls were taught to sew, as they would not have been allowed to take part in plays in those days!

Sparta

Miss Levett taught the children all about the city state of Sparta. They learnt all about what life was like for men and women, famous Spartans and the Battle of Thermopylae. Following this, they spent some time training as Spartans by developing their javelin throwing skills . They really impressed Miss Levett with their throwing skills, even though some of them very nearly hit her!

Greek Food

As part of our Greek day, we also tried to replicate some of the traditional Greek culture, such as trying some Greek food. The children tried some olives and feta at the end of the morning (only a few children were put off their lunch!). Ideally, we would have had some beautiful warm weather too, but sadly it was not to be!

Overall, we had a fantastic day learning all about these two important city states and at the end, we asked children to choose which city state they would have preferred to live in if they had been an Ancient Greek boy or girl. The majority chose Sparta (particularly girls, as women had a lot more rights!), but there were quite a few votes for Athens too!

We hope you all have a lovely weekend,

Miss Wetherill and Miss Levett

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Who could resist news like this?

02/10/2020 at 16:14

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Maths

In maths this week, we have been learning about negative numbers – particularly in the context of temperature. The children worked well with this and quickly realised that the larger the negative number appeared to be, the smaller it’s actual value became. This led to some very interesting comparison and difference questions which the children struggled with initially, but had mastered by the end of the week.

We also spent some time looking at how we can increase and decrease numbers by powers of 10 and what happens to the number when you do. The trickiest part of this was working out what to do if you were increasing a column with a 9 or decreasing a column with a 0. This week’s homework ties in with this skill, so we will be interested to see how you do!

Literacy

In our literacy lessons we have been continuing our dive into the Odyssey. We started by actually writing the diary entries that we had planned at the end of last week. This meant putting ourselves in the metaphorical shoes of the cyclops Polyphemus and considering how he would tell the story of his encounter with Odysseus. We quickly realised that in this version, the ‘villain’ would be Odysseus – a thief and a liar! Nobody could be worse than him…

Following on from this, we started to look at how newspaper articles were created, analysing some real life examples to identify the key features. We then used what we had learned to plan our own articles based either on Odysseus’ trip to Circe’s island of Aeaea or his final battle with the suitors. Check back next week to see how we did!

Science

We have been continuing our work on forces this week, this time looking at another type of friction known as water resistance. The classes started off by considering whether it was easier to run through water or through air and creating some theories about why this might be. We then put these theories to the test by testing how quickly different 3D shapes would move through water. We discovered that shapes that have a tapered or curved tip, such as cones or pyramids are more streamlined and therefore moved more easily through the water. We also noticed a similar pattern in the shapes of sea creatures such as fish and sharks.

History

Our topic lesson this week was all about the Olympics, which were started in Ancient Greek as a festival in Zeus’ honour. After spending some time thinking about what our modern Olympics are like, we used some photography of Greek pottery to try and make comparisons between the two versions. The children made some truly excellent observations and although we thought they would be quite different, the children were surprised to learn that many of the events we do today were also events that the Ancient Greek athletes competed in.

Next week, on Thursday 8th, we will be having our annual Greek day. Your child may come dressed up as an Ancient Greek citizen (not a god or monster) and will be learning all about Athens and Sparta, two very influential Greek city states.

We hope you have a fantastic weekend!

Miss Levett and Miss Wetherill

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Changing Perspectives…

25/09/2020 at 19:22

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Maths

We have continued with our place value work this week, investigating numbers up to 1 million, ordering and comparing numbers and rounding numbers to the nearest 100,000. We’ve been really impressed with the children’s mathematical thinking and reasoning!

Literacy

In literacy this week, we finished exploring the Odyssey and began focussing on the encounter between Odysseus and Polyphemus, the misunderstood cyclops. We thought about the encounter from Polyphemus’ perspective, recalling the events that took place and how Polyphemus might have felt about it all. To help us with this, we watched a fantastic video where Polyphemus tells us about his side of the story! We have shared the link to the video below. We all loved watching the video and grew very fond of the ‘evil’ monster. Next week, we will be writing a diary entry from Polyphemus’ point of view.

Science

In science this week, we began exploring friction, which is caused by two surfaces sliding against one another. We looked at the ways in which friction helps us, such as stopping us slipping when we walk and explored which materials cause the most and least friction. To test which materials caused the most friction, we used Newton Metres to measure the force needed to pull a heavy book across different materials. We then looked for patterns in the data to discover what type of material caused the most friction. We summarised that rough, bumpy surfaces caused the most.

Topic

We continued with our Ancient Greece topic this week, exploring the Ancient Greek Gods and Goddesses. We created a family tree of the Titans and the Greek Gods (specifically the Olympians). The children were fascinated to learn about how the Gods and Goddesses were related to one another, and enjoyed finding out the role of each God and Goddess.

Homework

  • Maths homework this week will be consolidating place value knowledge of numbers up to one million.
  • This week’s learning log homework is to research one of the Ancient Greek myths from the list provided.
  • As usual, continue to use Spelling Shed, Mathletics and TT Rockstars to keep on top of your basic skills!

We hope you all have a restful weekend,

Miss Wetherill and Miss Levett

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The Odyssey Begins…

18/09/2020 at 16:08

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This has been another great week for Year 5. The children have been delving deeper into the topics that we started in the previous week and have been producing some really fantastic work!

Literacy

In literacy this week, we have been continuing our exploration of Greek mythology. We started off by looking at the story of how Perseus killed the fearsome monster Medusa to keep his mother safe from an evil king, asking the children to pull out the key events of the myth and use them to create a clear summary. Towards the end of the week, 5L started learning the story of ‘The Odyssey’. This is quite a complicated tale so we will be continuing this work next week, but so far the children have engaged really well with it (they seemed to particularly enjoy the part where Odysseus lost 11 of his 12 ships to a giant attack)! 5W will be diving into the same story at the start of next week.

Maths

In maths, we have been continuing our work on place value, with a particular focus on rounding numbers to powers of ten. By the end of the week, we were rounding numbers with 6 digits to the nearest 10, 100. 1000, 10,000 and 100,000. Though some children found this a little tricky, the whole class persevered and were able to develop both their understanding and their confidence (which is just as important!).

Science

In science this half-term, we are going to be looking at forces – what they are and how they can be used to help us. Over the last two weeks, we have been exploring the impact of gravity, while also discussing the theories set forward by Aristotle and Galileo. We learned that no matter the mass of an object, gravity will always pull it towards the Earth at the same speed as any other object, unless another force such as air resistance is in effect. We then took this learning to the next logical step, designing and testing parachutes to find out how they work. The children tested factors such as size, shape and material, to see which parachute was the most effective.

Topic

In history, we have been creating chronological timelines of Greek history. This is a very difficult skill as there were lots of different things to remember! First, we had to draw and label a timeline that would stretch from 6000BCE all the way to 1500CE so that we could fit everything in. We found this tricky at first, but eventually we managed to get our heads around it. The next step was actually plotting each period of Greek history, where we noticed that some actually overlapped and ran concurrently. We were so impressed with the class’ determination in this lesson!

This week’s maths homework is rounding to the nearest 10, 100 and 1000 and will be due in on Wednesday 23rd. Please remember that the learning log is also due in on the same date. We are really looking forward to learning all about you!

Enjoy your weekends!

Miss Levett and Miss Wetherill

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